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Velvet Machine by Yuri Turov

Yuri Turov, developer of Xynthesizr and Shoom, just released Velvet Machine! This AUv3 effect promises velvety sounds, similar to a reverb. Velvet Machine has a highly customizable volume envelope, along with other controls that let you get creative with it.

Velvet Machine

Sonic texture generator / blur / non-linear reverb

*** WARNING ***
Velvet Machine is an Audio Unit v3 plugin and requires a compatible host such as GarageBand, AUM, Cubasis, Audiobus etc. The provided standalone app does NOT support the currently deprecated Inter-App Audio.
***
Velvet Machine is a CPU-intensive effect. A *minimum* of 5th Gen iPad, iPhone 6s or 1st Gen iPhone SE is required to run a single instance at maximum settings. With shorter times and/or lower densities CPU use is proportionally lower, but can still be relatively high.
***

Velvet Machine is a unique audio effect based on real-time convolution with enveloped velvet noise. Here is what it can do:
- Stretch and blur out even short sounds to lengths of up to 10 seconds
- Produce reverb-like textures with flexible volume envelope (including reverse, fading in and out, pulsating etc.)
- Work as a variable density random multi-tap delay (bordering on granular-like sounds)

PDF manual and video demos are available on developer website.

Features:
- Flexible volume envelope with arbitrary number of segments and curvature
- Effect time ranging from 100 ms to 10 s
- Response density adjustable from 1 to 2000 repeats per second
- Predelay up to 500 ms
- High cut and low cut filters for the effected signal
- Mix adjustable from 100% dry to 100% wet with no dry signal
- Mix Lock to switch presets while keeping the dry/wet mix constant

There's a demo of the presets on Yuri Turov's channel. Here's a video from Gavinski’s Tutorials!

Reader Comments 11

Hey Tim, thanks for sharing! However, I would argue that the phrase "similar to a reverb" doesn't do it justice. Obviously I'm biased :D
October 17, 2020  | touch_app Yuri Turov
Thanks for posting Tim! Yuri - you’re not biased haha. As my description states, echoing Yuri’s release notes, it can do reverb but also blurring, stretching, something similar to a kind of granular delay, also something like reverse reverb effects. In a word (well two) - cool shit!
October 17, 2020  | person_outline Gavinski
On October 17, 2020 - @Yuri Turov said:
Hey Tim, thanks for sharing! However, I would argue that the phrase "similar to a reverb" doesn't do it justice. Obviously I'm biased :D
I struggled pretty hard with the description! I want to express that it has similarities to something people have some prior experience with, while not being dismissively simple like: "This is a fancy verb."
It's nice to have a convolution reverb with the ability to contour the envelope.

I suppose someone could get a similar result from pre-processing IR's (impulse responses) but this is more clever, and way more convenient.

It's not easy to get a clear definition of 'velvet noise'. I saw it described as the noise-like quality of late reflections. I heard examples on YT that sound like filtered (contoured) noise (like brown, pink, or white). I've heard some convolution reverbs that use noise-based IRs and they sound ok-- but for traditional spaces, it doesn't work very well.

I have a desktop plugin called Fog Convolver which gives me some control over the envelope of the IR. Velvet appears to give much greater control over the envelope, but not over the IR (?)
October 17, 2020  | favorite_border stub
On October 17, 2020 - @stub said:
It's nice to have a convolution reverb with the ability to contour the envelope.

I suppose someone could get a similar result from pre-processing IR's (impulse responses) but this is more clever, and way more convenient.

It's not easy to get a clear definition of 'velvet noise'. I saw it described as the noise-like quality of late reflections. I heard examples on YT that sound like filtered (contoured) noise (like brown, pink, or white). I've heard some convolution reverbs that use noise-based IRs and they sound ok-- but for traditional spaces, it doesn't work very well.

I have a desktop plugin called Fog Convolver which gives me some control over the envelope of the IR. Velvet appears to give much greater control over the envelope, but not over the IR (?)

AFAIK, the name 'velvet noise' comes from a 2007 AES paper by M. Karjalainen and H. Järveläinen. In the context of their work it's clearly defined and the term seems to have caught on - I've seen it in a number of papers since.

What do you mean exactly by control over the IR in this case?
October 17, 2020  | touch_app Yuri Turov
@Yuri Turov

Fog Convolver allows me to choose an IR and then pre-delay, ramp on, ramp off, and ramp curves.

If Velvet uses a sample of velvet noise as the IR, then I'm assuming it doesn't allow one to choose a different IR. But it gives more flexible control over the entire envelope of the sound than Fog does.
October 17, 2020  | favorite_border stub
@stub

Well, Velvet Machine is not a general purpose IR convolver, nor does it use one internally. There's no IR in the sense of a large wave file or buffer. VM is built with velvet noise in mind, taking advantage of its sparsity to perform convolution directly in time domain, as opposed to FFT-based 'fast convolution' algorithms. This approach has certain benefits:
- No latency
- Cheaper to perform smooth time and/or envelope changes.
- Comparable or better performance (I haven't run extensive tests, and I don't know how fast Thafknar is, but IIRC Velvet Machine used about 2 times less CPU than Thafknar for the same response length)

So yes, the control over the virtual IR is somewhat limited - envelope, density, LP and HP filters for the whole response and stereo width.
On the other hand, changing the density is just a turn of a knob, whereas with a general purpose IR convolver one would have to juggle a few dozen custom-generated IRs.
October 17, 2020  | touch_app Yuri Turov
As far as I could get it, It is like a reverb with controlled tail and controlled quantity of layering which makes a legato effect. Good stuff! – Yet sounds a bit mechanical because, as opposed to real world-recorded IRs in convolution reverbs, this app make the tail out of repetitions of a curve. Nevertheless it covered by a good choice of controls given, which is certainly impossible in convolution reberbs by the nature of their design.
October 17, 2020  | favorite_border eVr
Good info! Thanks @Yuri Turov and @eVr
October 17, 2020  | favorite_border stub
@eVr
Yes. An important difference is that unlike a reverb, the 'reflection' density is constant and filtering is non-recursive. In a way, the fact that it can still work as a reverb is a by-product, but the goal was sound stretching/blurring.
October 18, 2020  | touch_app Yuri Turov
I like this app a lot. It certainly adds a different set of sound design options to my toolkit. Unique and familiar at the same time, sorta like a reverb and a velocity envelope, sorta...
October 18, 2020  | person_outline Regulario
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