« TC-11 Updated with Audiobus | App News | Sound Cells Demo »

Interview: Sonoma's CEO on Android

Palm Sounds conducted an interview with Doug Wright, Sonoma Wireworks CEO. Sonoma brought us the wonderful AudioCopyPaste standard, before shifting their sights to Android development. At Winter NAMM, Sonoma announced their Android Low Latency Audio Solution, which intends to address the latency that is currently hindering Android music app development.

Ashley Elsdon from Palm Sounds spoke with Doug about why they decided to tackle this challenge.

"Users have been asking us for Android versions of our products since 2008. We didn't move in that direction due to Android latency issues, and stuck with iOS as exclusively. When GarageBand was released on iOS in 2011, we saw a marked reduction in our recording app sales. Android is a market that doesn't have a recording app competitor with prime time TV ad money. We realized we had the right team of engineers to solve the latency problem and musicians were contacting us with more requests for Android solutions, so we got to work." - Doug Wright, Sonoma Wireworks CEO

Earlier this week a developer was asking for my opinion on the pricing structure for his app. He felt that a $5 asking price was being extremely generous. I agree with the sentiment, but pointed out that GarageBand is $5, and his app wasn't quite on par with Apple's! I understand Doug's decision.

Read the full interview over on Palm Sounds for more interesting insights!

Reader Comments 5

From the article, about market saturation:

"...even when FourTrack was a top 50 music app at $10, those sales alone could not fund a dedicated development team."

One of the more stunning things to me about being an iPad owner is the amount of quality applications for such a low low price. Even more stunning is how often many of these apps are updated... For free!

I know some people get pissed when developers start putting in in-app purchases in their apps, but I tend to think it is foolish to do it any other way. I am hard pressed to find other business that offer up services without any sort of real and direct compensation.

March 29, 2013  | person_outline Jesse

The dynamics of the app store are really interesting; there are 14 bajillion people who have iDevices, and if you can sell to a significant fraction of them, you're rich, even if the app is $1 a shot. Increasing the price of an app rapidly decreases the number of people who will buy. And the door is open for pretty much anyone to make an app, and get in on the action, so there are a ton of really small development teams who are hungry, and willing to take a chance. I see my development work as something of a lottery ticket -- I'm making a bit of money now, but it's less than I'd make if I was taking the consulting jobs that come my way. There's enough income to keep me active, though, and always the potential that I'll hit the right thing at the right time. I also find the app coding a lot of fun; the development environment is nice, and the iPhone and iPad have tons of cool things to mess with.

The app store model works very well for the end user -- fantastic software at bargain basement prices. It also works very well for Apple; every new app is a reason for someone to not switch to another device (plus they get a healthy cut of the sales). It doesn't work very well for what I'd call traditional software development companies, but it does open the door for the renegades, malcontents, and trouble makers.

March 29, 2013  | person_outline Fessaboy/Secret Base Design

"...it does open the door for the renegades, malcontents, and trouble makers."

Renegades, malcontents, and trouble makers who, in my opinion, tend to come up with much more interesting ideas.

http://youtu.be/1xep8s2eMBo

March 29, 2013  | person_outline Jesse

"much more interesting ideas." -- exactly....

March 29, 2013  | person_outline Fessaboy/Secret Base Design

Fessaboy wrote: " The dynamics of the app store are really interesting; there are 14 bajillion people who have iDevices, and if you can sell to a significant fraction of them, you're rich, even if the app is $1 a shot. "

You can achieve that with a game or camera app but, as you would know as a developer, it is harder to strike gold with a specialised music app.

I think many of the music apps we buy are too inexpensive. Off the top of my head, Sound Cells for $1 is too cheap. Figure for $1. Also Guitarism for $2.99... and there are many others.

I want to see developers do well so they keep updating apps, so I don't mind paying a few buck extra or buying an IAP.

I'd love to know how the more expensive apps ($5-15) like Samplr or Live FX or EchoPad etc sell. Are there enough 'serious' buyers to keep these guys afloat?

March 30, 2013  | person_outline Simon
comment

  Post a New Comment

Anonymous comments are closed for old articles. If you'd like to comment please Register.

Comment:

Do not use HTML in your comments. Tags: [b] Bold Text [/b] [i] Italic Text [/i]
Links will be generated if you include http:// or https:// at the beginning of a URL.
Submit