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Tabletop for iPad Impressions

A mere thirty minutes after my review of Rhythm Studio went up I got an email from Dan, Co-Founder of Retronyms, regarding my comments on their pricing model for Tabletop. He wanted me to try it out, so he gave me a promo-code with a request for feedback.

This article features all of my impressions; the $5 content is unlocked with the retail price of the promo-code. I have included optional In-Article Purchases offering further consultation, which are not included in the original price, for users who feel they need the additional content.

Tabletop is a sexy App. The navigation is smooth and the interface is well thought out. You can tell they got a real artist in on the project and not the accountant who "knows some Photoshop." Unfortunately the artist missed a trick, which is [Good Idea, In-Article Purchase - $9.99 Consulting Fee]. This is an important facet to any music App, as it should be instantly inspiring.

The included instruments in Tabletop's modular environment offer a fairly good mix. The ability to route audio with a visual wire connection is both intuitive and powerful. There is little that could be asked for here, though I did think the GridLok Pad Sampler would benefit from a [Another Good Idea, In-Article Purchase - $9.99 Consulting Fee], which would greatly extend its capability and fit well in the modular design.

Since I started off on hardware I was immediately comfortable with Tabletop's modus operandi. All of the instruments behave as expected. However, users more familiar with software environments may have a problem with this. I have received a lot of viewer criticism of [Trade Secret, In-Article Purchase - $99.99 Consulting Fee] in technoBox2 and Rhythm Studio, both also slavishly beholden to the hardware they emulate.

Fortunately Tabletop looks like it has the underlying architecture to over-come this present shortfall. With existing assets they could tweak some back-end to add [Great Idea, In-Article Purchase - $99.99 Consulting Fee]!

This core technology could add additional functionality in other areas as well:

As you can see, Tabletop's appeal is obvious with a lot going for it, but to get into the useful stuff you should be prepared to make additional purchases beyond the initial $5 investment.

Retronyms has a lot of passion for the project and are unquestionably dedicated to extending it as a platform. With their commitment to further development it is easy to imagine them patching in [Great Idea, In-Article Purchase - $99.99 Consulting Fee] as a future In-App Purchase. With that achieved, musicians comfortable with both software and hardware will want to make sure that Tabletop is a part of their music making!

Reader Comments 5

Can't tell if trolling with the [Great Idea, In-Article Purchase - $99.99 Consulting Fee] crap or not. Are you doing this because you can't use any of this software, or are you just trying to make money.

September 05, 2011  | person_outline q

It is all meant satirically, but if you follow the links they all go to a kind of CV/Resume page.

September 06, 2011  | person_outline discchord

Just spit my morning coffee all over my monitor.. good one!

September 06, 2011  | person_outline atticus

So is it worth the money?

September 09, 2011  | person_outline what

Worth is very subjective, the value of $5 can be wildly different to different people, so I don't want to get into that.

Objectively; my jaw dropped open when they raised the price to $15 this week. They're saying they think the value of it, out-of-the-box without the IAPs, is the same as their other app, ReBirth. On that I will disagree.

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